A Comprehensive Patient and Public Involvement Program Evaluating Perception of Cannabis-Derived Medicinal Products in the Treatment of Acute Postoperative Pain, Nausea, and Vomiting Using a Qualitative Thematic Framework

Abstract

Introduction: Cannabis-derived medicinal products (CDMPs) have antiemetic properties and in combination with opioids have synergistic analgesic effects in part signaling through the delta and kappa opioid receptors. The objective of this patient and public involvement program was to determine perception of perioperative CDMPs in our local population to inform design of a clinical trial.

Methods: A qualitative evaluation was conducted utilizing a focus group, semistructured interviews and a community event. Analysis was conducted through the framework methodology. Verbatim transcriptions were coded categorically into analytical frameworks for thematic analysis. Emergent themes and associated degree of consensus/dissent were determined. The participant cohort was composed of a group of patients and relatives representative of the target population (M:F=1:1, age range 33–85).

Results: Most common coding categories in thematic analysis framework included side-effect profile, trial schedule of events, and safety. Consensus was that potential benefits of CDMPs were attractive compared with the known risk profile of opioid use. Decrease in opioid dependence was agreed to be an appropriate clinical end-point for a randomized controlled clinical trial and there was concurrence of positive opinion of a therapeutic schedule of 5 days. Negative CDMP perceptions included addiction, dysphoria, and adverse effects in psychiatric subpopulations. Sublingual or oral administration was the most acceptable route of administration, with some expressing that inhalation delegitimizes therapeutic properties.

Conclusions: The perception of postoperative CDMP therapy was overwhelmingly positive in this West London population. The data from this thematic analysis will inform protocol development of clinical trials to determine analgesic and antiemetic efficacy of CDMPs.

Original article can be found here: https://doi.org/10.1089/can.2019.0020