Endometriosis: What is Endometriosis?

The below information is purely for educational purposes and does not constitute medical advice. This content should not be used as a substitute for professional medical advice.

Endometriosis is a long-term condition where endometrial tissue (which is usually only found in the lining of the womb) grows outside of the womb in other places such as the abdomen or pelvis. This tissue can often be adherent to fallopian tubes, ovaries, or other organs. The condition affects people who have menstrual periods and is more common in those aged between 30 and 40.

Evidence suggests people are more susceptible if they:

  • Have never had children
  • Have periods that last 7 days or more
  • Have short menstrual cycles of 27 days or less
  • Have a family history of endometriosis
  • Have a health problem that affects the normal flow of menstrual blood

Endometriosis Pain

The pain from endometriosis can be moderate to severe, this normally depends on the volume of endometrial tissue found outside of the womb, but sometimes those with very few endometrial deposits are heavily affected by pain and vice versa. We talk more about the stages and severity of endometriosis below, but here we will explain why endometriosis is painful.

Endometrial tissue is made up of glandular cells usually only found in the lining of the uterus.  Their purpose is to provide a place for a fertilised embryo to attach to at the beginning of a pregnancy. Endometrial cells grow in size and number during the menstrual cycle in response to the hormones produced by the ovaries. Normally, these cells die and shed when a person does not fall pregnant, and they leave the body through the vagina during a menstrual period.

Endometrial tissue that grows outside of the womb also responds to the hormones produced by the ovaries. In response to the hormones, the legions thicken and swell and then shed off and bleed during a menstrual period. This causes pain through irritating organs that the endometrial tissue adherent too. It also causes pain through the collection of blood in the abdomen and pelvis which irritates the lining, which is rich with nerve fibres. Finally, endometriosis can lead to scarring and the development of adhesions between pelvis and abdominal organs, leading to pain during routine bodily functions and therefore resulting in pain outside of menstrual periods.

What Causes Endometriosis?

Endometriosis is extremely common and is estimated to affect 1 in 10 women of reproductive age.

Whilst the exact cause of endometriosis is unknown, the most common explanation given for the condition is ‘retrograde menstruation’ whereby endometrial tissue migrates out of the womb through propulsion of tissue out of the fallopian tubes during a menstrual period. Risk factors that are associated with the development of endometriosis include:

  • Genetics – having a close relative who has the condition increases the likelihood of also having endometriosis
  • Menstrual and reproductive history – early age of first period (less than 12 years), short menstrual cycles (less than 26 days), not having children
  • Weight – Leaner individuals have been shown to be more likely to have endometriosis
  • Ethnicity – caucasian individuals are more likely to have endometriosis compared to those of other ethnicities.

Endometriosis Symptoms

The symptoms of endometriosis include:

  • Pain in the lower area of the stomach and/or the back
  • Chronic period pain that impacts the ability to complete normal day-to-day tasks
  • Pain during or after sex
  • Pain during bladder or bowel movements
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhoea or constipation
  • Bloody in the urine or poo during a period
  • Difficulty conceiving a baby

Additional to these signs of endometriosis, one may experience heavier than normal periods. People with endometriosis may use a lot of sanitary pads or tampons and may even bleed through clothing.

The symptoms can be debilitating and seriously impact an individual’s life, potentially affecting their mental health and wellbeing.

Endometriosis Diagnosis

It is important to see a GP if any mentioned symptoms are present, especially if they are significantly impacting daily life.

Diagnosis can take time as symptoms may vary considerably between patients and can be very similar to those of other conditions. On average, it takes people with endometriosis 7.5 years to receive a diagnosis.

Initially, a GP will ask about the symptoms – it is recommended to keep a diary of pain and symptoms, particularly if these are related to the menstrual cycle.

The GP may also complete an examination of the tummy and vagina.

A GP may consider a short trial of painkillers to try and help with pain, as well as offering hormonal treatment, such as the combined oral contraceptive pill or a progestogen-only contraceptive.

If these are not effective, or severe, persistent, or recurrent symptoms of endometriosis a GP may refer to a gynaecologist to make a formal diagnosis. This can only definitively be made by keyhole (laparoscopic) surgery, however, they may also consider an MRI or ultrasound on a case-by-case basis.

Endometriosis Stages

Endometriosis is graded in stages according to the location and number of endometrial deposits seen during keyhole (laparoscopic) surgery. These stages refer to stages of endometriosis with respect to the severity of visible disease during this investigation. It does not represent the severity of symptoms someone may be affected by, which may be discordant with these findings for many individuals. The stages are categorised as follows:

  • Stage 1 endometriosis (minimal)

  • Stage 2 endometriosis (mild)

  • Stage 3 endometriosis (moderate)

  • Stage 4 endometriosis (severe)

Treatments for Endometriosis

There is no cure for endometriosis but symptoms can be managed by trialling different endometriosis treatments.

The treatment will depend on the severity of the symptoms and include:

  • Painkillers such as ibuprofen and paracetamol
  • Hormone medicines and contraceptives
  • Surgery can be considered to remove endometrial tissue that has grown outside of the womb

In severe cases, surgery may be considered to remove part or all of the organ affected by the condition.

Endometriosis FAQs

Accordion Content

The exact cause of endometriosis is unknown. The most common explanation given for the condition is ‘retrograde menstruation’ whereby endometrial tissue migrates out of the womb through propulsion of tissue out of the fallopian tubes during a menstrual period. Risk factors that are associated with the development of endometriosis include:

  • Genetics – having a close relative who has the condition increases the likelihood of also having endometriosis
  • Menstrual and reproductive history – early age of first period (less than 12 years), short menstrual cycles (less than 26 days), not having children
  • Weight – Leaner individuals have been shown to be more likely to have endometriosis
  • Ethnicity – caucasian individuals are more likely to have endometriosis compared to those of other ethnicities.
Accordion Content

Endometriosis causes tissue (endometrial tissue) that is similar to that which lines the womb to grow in the wrong location. This can cause symptoms, such as

  • Pain in the lower area of the stomach and/or the back
  • Chronic period pain that impacts the ability to complete normal day-to-day tasks
  • Pain during or after sex
  • Pain during bladder or bowel movements
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhoea or constipation
  • Bloody in the urine or poo during a period
  • Difficulty conceiving a baby
Accordion Content

Endometriosis is an extremely common condition which is estimated to affect 1 in 10 women. Thankfully most people with endometriosis can continue to live their lives as they intend, with some never even knowing that they have endometriosis. However, there are a significant number who are affected by severe pain, bleeding, or complications to affected organs which might need emergency intervention, including surgery.

Accordion Content

You may hear endometriosis being referred to as ‘endo’ as an abbreviation for endometriosis. The term is not commonly used by medical professionals; however, many people with the condition use the term endo as a shortened way of saying endometriosis. These are typically used by advocacy or patient support groups who commonly refer to the community of people with endometriosis as ‘endo warriors’.

Arrange an Appointment

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Eligible patients can provide us with their healthcare records or we can obtain these through your GP. This is to confirm that a patient’s condition has been fully assessed and all other treatment options have been attempted. We will ensure that the primary care provider receives all treatment communication to maintain the highest level of clinical governance.

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Pricing

Sapphire Access Scheme

Initial
Consultation

£ 50

Follow-up
Consultation

£ 50

Quarterly
Check-up

£ 50

Average Cost of Treatment

To help patients understand the likely cost of treatment, we have outlined the average cost to a patient with chronic pain. Cost of medication varies on an individual patient bases.

£135/month*

Inclusive Of Appointments And Medicine

£4.43/day*

Inclusive Of Appointments And Medicine
No repeat prescription fee

Average cost to a patient with chronic pain using dried cannabis flower

£127/month*

Inclusive Of Appointments And Medicine

£4.18/day*

Inclusive Of Appointments And Medicine
No repeat prescription fee
For more details including some exceptions, see full price list: